Robert Ivy Receives Noel Polk Award

A great Noel Polk Lifetime Achievement award has gone to the architect world for the first time. This honor goes to non-other than Robert Ivy. Robert has joined the likes of late Walter Anderson, Eudora Welty, Morgan Freeman and Shelby Foote who are just a small list of Mississippians ever to win the award. He is a worldwide author and commentator on architecture.

The Award goes to a Mississippi-connected artist who has exceptional skills in acting and performing or has the stud out in supporting the art. It is indeed a great achievement for Robert Ivy and the entire American Institute of Architects. He has received the honor owing to his effort in making architecture more accessible to the general public. He has done it more than other Mississippians.

Before joining American Institute of Architects (AIA), Robert Ivy was Editor-in-Chief of McGraw-Hill’s Architectural Record. His leadership made Architectural Record a highly disseminated architectural journal all over the world. He was awarded the National Magazine Award for excellence. Robert also led the company in its expansion to China and the Middle East where he launched a Mandarin Version of Architect.

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Ivy has grown the AIA into a global institute. In the history of the Institution, it has never recorded such high membership level since its establishment. AIA is now operating all over the world.

Before his journey to architect world, Robert Ivy served as an officer in the US Navy. He attended Sewanee University where he graduated with a bachelor’s degree in English (Arts). He joined Tulane University later to pursue his passion where he graduated with a master degree in architecture.

To date, Robert Ivy is the Chief Executive Officer of AIA. He has encouraged his fellow architects to focus not only on building, design, and construction but also concentrate on embracing software engineering technology. In AIA, he has impacted the institution to focus on promoting public health. According to him, the society will regulate diabetes and heart diseases when new buildings, which encourage exercises, for example, eliminating the need for lift when the distance upstairs is small. In fact, he advocates on new designs, which will not only maintain the hearth of the society but improve it at the same time.

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