Michael Lacey

Michael Lacey is a United States native mathematician born on September 26, 1959. The thesis paper he wrote at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1987, which is where he received his PhD, created a solution for the problem related to the doctrine of the iterated logarithm for “empirical characteristic functions”.

His research has been recognized by several awards including Guggenheim and the Simons Foundations.

Lacey’s first postdoctoral careers were at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Louisiana State University. While in Chapel Hill he, along with Walter Phillipp, gave proof of central limit theorem. Lacey went on to receive the National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship while in a position at Indiana University from 1989 to 1996. During his time of fellowship he began a study of the bi-linear Hilbert transform. Read more: Michael Lacey | GAtech and Michael Lacey | Wikipedia

The Hilbert transform is a specific linear operator that takes a function of a real variable and produces another function of a real variable. This subject that Michael Lacey and Christoph Thiele found a solution to in 1996 is why he was given the Salem Prize. Learn more about Michael Lacey: https://arxiv.org/a/lacey_m_1.html and http://nyjm.albany.edu/j/2017/23-8.html

The highly prestigious award was founded by the widow of Raphael Salem and is awarded every year to a young mathematician judged to have done outstanding work in the theory of Fourier series.The brilliant mathematician joined the Georgia Tech faculty in 1996.

Since then, Lacey has been recognized for his research and has also been the director of training grants. Such as VIGRE and MCTP awards from the NSF, these have supported dozens of undergraduates, graduate students and postdocs. He advises and mentors several undergraduates and postdoc students.

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