Dr. Eric Forsthoefel discusses how hospitals can relieve congestion in their emergency rooms

One of the most stubborn problems in modern healthcare systems is congestion in the emergency room. According to a study conducted by three organizations: NPR, Harvard T.H Chan School of public health, and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, about 30 percent of the American population visits the ER when in need of some medical care.

This is a significant setback to emergency rooms. The non-urgent cases not only put undue stress on staff and resources but also have the potential to cause loss of life. Lives may be lost due to the lack of equipment and staff to attend to patients in dire need of help because they are busy attending to the non-urgent cases.

Emergency rooms are by design meant to handle emergency cases. The equipment and staff in these rooms have been set up to attend to emergency cases. When hospitals allocate such resources to non-urgent instances, most of these resources are underutilized.

 

What is worrying is that this trend has a long tradition. According to a study conducted over three decades ago, this trend has remained stubborn since the 1990s. The study found out that 37 percent of patients who visited the ER in that period were treated for non-urgent conditions.

 

What ER doctors think

According to Dr. Eric Forsthoefel who is an emergency room doctor, most of these visits are due to the chronic lack of primary healthcare providers. Since the patients may not have a way to access health care in a primary care facility, they are forced to seek help in an emergency room.

 

Why people visit emergency rooms despite not needing urgent care

According to a study conducted in 1991 by the Annals of emergency medicine, patients interviewed at George Washington University hospital’s emergency room gave three main reasons for visiting the ER to seek non-urgent care.

 

They stated that they were there because accessing primary healthcare services would take long. Other participants stated that they liked the convenience of an emergency room because they were not signed up by a primary healthcare provider.

 

According to the study, people from low-income backgrounds visited the emergency room because a primary health care provider did not cover them. The emergency rooms were the only place they could get medical care without having to dig deep in their pockets.

Patients from high income earning backgrounds and those with insurance covers, on the other hand, stated that they visited the ER because they thought it was convenient. By visiting the ER, they did not have to spend a lot of time scheduling a visit.

About Dr. Eric Forsthoefel

Dr. Eric Forsthoefel is a medical emergency room doctor that studied at University of Louisville and later Louisiana state university where he studied emergency medicine. Dr. Eric holds emergency medical licenses both in the state of Los Angeles and in Florida. Dr. Eric Forsthoefel also has more than six years of experience working in an emergency room.

https://www.healthcare4ppl.com/physician/florida/tallahasse/eric-forsthoefel-1013150549.html

Dr. Saad Saad invents a catheter with electromagnetic location device

Saad Saad has had a very successful career as a medical professional. He has been a pediatric surgeon for the past 40 years, practicing in the United States. He has been working with various medical centers in New Jersey up until his retirement recently. In his career, he has assisted thousands of patients to resolve their medical conditions. He has used his experience in the industry to come up with treatment methods that improve the existing methods of treating patients. He has always looked at changing the status by coming up with new and innovative ways of treatment. His concern is mainly to reduce pain and risks for the patients.

 

 

 

Dr. Saad Saad has two patented innovations which he developed so that he could improve on the delivery of pediatric surgeries. For the years that he has been in the medical industry, he has always looked for ways of improving service delivery. He has served his patients in the United States and beyond with commitment and dedication. He has been on medical missions around the country and in the Middle East. In Palestine-where he was born- he has participated in eight medical missions. Most of these medical missions were organized by humanitarian groups and were conducted without any fee. Dr. Saad Saad used this as an avenue to treat children and young adults with complex medical conditions.

 

 

 

The catheter

 

 

 

The catheter is a device that is used for diverse function in the medical industry. Some of the functions require the tube to be inserted inside the body. The tube can be left in the body either temporarily or permanently. However, there is always a challenge with the position of a catheter inside the body. One needs to know its location, and the only way to do that is by tracking its position. Traditionally, an MRI Machine or X-ray scan is used to find its position. However, these two can be tedious and ineffective to the surgical operations.

 

 

 

Dr.Saad Saad looked at the disadvantages encountered when using the traditional methods and decided to come up with another alternative that would not need scanning. He created a catheter that has a location identification device. This catheter can be tracked without the need for an x-ray or MRI Machine.

 

 

 

With an external locating device, a doctor will trace the Cather inside the body with ease. This device by Dr. Saad Saad is critical in cases of emergencies. It is also a safe way of locating the catheter instead of the locating wires which are traditionally used by doctors.

 

 

 

This catheter is yet to be manufactured for mass productions. It involves a complex manufacturing procedure which manufacturers are still exploring how to go about it. There is hope that in the near future it will be in the market after one company from Utah showed interest in doing the manufacturing. Learn more: https://www.linkedin.com/in/saad-saad-524707159/

 

 

Saad Saad: A Doctor and His Inventions

Becoming a doctor takes a high amount of industriousness and discipline. Not everybody has the fortitude to succeed. Becoming an inventor takes foresight and imagination. Dr. Saad Saad has devoted his life to both of these endeavors and has done it with a deep sense of compassion for humanity. Specializing in pediatrics, he was always on the look-out for ways to enhance the present methods of doing things regarding pain management and general risk reduction for his patients. His devotion to his craft resulted in the patenting of two medical inventions and multiple new methods of surgery. He currently retires in New Jersey after a 47-year career as a pediatric surgeon.

Dr. Saad’s first invention was a catheter with an electromagnetic location identification device. A catheter is a tube that gets inserted into canals or body cavities that permit injections, fluid withdrawal or to keep a specific passage in the body open. Putting the catheter in the right place requires surgeons to track and monitor its position reliably. The method conventionally used to do this is by taking X-rays. This practice continues despite knowledge that constant use of X-rays exposes the patient to unsafe levels of radiation. The alternative is MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging), but those machines are huge and impractical much of the time.

The need to have a better way of locating the catheter inside of the body led to Dr. Saad’s invention of a tracking device that doesn’t require the use of large scanning machinery. Other methods also use guiding wires to track placement which sometimes break inside of the patient. His model works like a metal detector. The user sweeps the device around the outside of a patient’s body until it connects to the electromagnetic locator at the tip of the catheter and is perpendicular to it. A light goes on in the external locator to let the user know that they are directly above it. It’s portable and safer than the other options and is faster in emergencies. Due to complex assembly procedures, manufacturers were regrettably reluctant to make it. A company in Utah, however, is showing an interest.

His second patent improves the function of endoscopes. An endoscope is an optical instrument used to look inside of the body. They are employed by doctors to examine internal organs and provide visual insight into a patient’s internal condition. When inside the body, however, the endoscope’s lens gets fogged and obstructed by liquids. The standard procedure for solving this problem has been to take out the endoscope, insert a suction tube to clear the area and reinsert it. After reinsertion, the doctor has to find his place again from scratch. Dr. Saad’s solution was to install a suction-irrigation device on the endoscope. This way the user can clear his view in an instant. He has tested this invention personally and has removed many objects with it that young children have swallowed. This device is very cheap to produce and is used today by doctors everywhere. Learn more: https://www.crunchbase.com/person/saad-saad

The world enjoys the legacy from which Dr. Saad left for future generations to learn and benefit. When asked in an interview on his blog what daily habit makes him the most productive he said, “you should never wait for tomorrow to do something you can accomplish today.” His career is proof that he took his advice to heart.